Merry Christmas

Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanzaa, Festivus, Solstice, Bodhi Day are all Decemberwallcoo.com_Christmas_illustration_20071218_el celebrations that inspire, if not encourage, reflection, love, family and forgiveness. Yes, Festivus too. In my culture Christmas suspends time in favor of the emergent soul and its budding faith. It’s also true that, for many, Christmas trappings include traditional family sports arguments, an abundance of food, and gifts galore. The more years I pile on, the less time I choose to spend with the trappings.

On the eve of this Christmas, the house is filled with the noise of two generations of kids; the older kids vying to be young and the much younger adopted siblings squabbling with each other and vying to be old. I find myself grateful for the solace of baking pies and my wee office embraced by hundreds of friendly books piled on and under my desk or stacked somewhat orderly in book cases. The pungent odors of baking spices brightens the room. The noise distanced by several rooms, a closed door, and a yard sounds like music. No one needs me now. It’s my time for reflection and gratitude.

Like a leaf caught in a meander, I wonder why. Why the cruel and unnecessary human and animal violence? Why the divisions of culture and religion each claiming a superior position? Why the false flags and political subterfuges? Why the homeless? Why the homeless veterans? Contemplating why is like pondering infinity, it ties the brain and the soul in knots.

Gratitude is a much easier branch on the river of life; the current is strong and defined. Like you, I can trace my family back to the Revolutionary War and the founding of this country I love. Family members have fought, died, been crippled physically and emotionally, and survived in every war and major U.S. military action. Most fought in the uniformed services, but many contributed in support services. Tonight and tomorrow, our family will celebrate Christmas according to our own traditions because my forefathers and millions of their brethren kept the United States alive. All people in the countries we call the Free World can tell the same tale.

Most of us find comfort in the celebrations of December. We relax our bodies and our paranoia to celebrate a dream of what might be. That’s not always been wise. George

Christmas 1916 an Australian Observation Post near Fleurbaix

Christmas 1916 an Australian Observation Post near Fleurbaix

Washington attacked the Hessians in Trenton, New Jersey on Christmas in 1776. Surprise. It was Christmas 1862, when Confederate cavalry commander John Hunt Morgan launched a Christmas Raid into Kentucky. The Rebel horsemen attacked Union supply convoys, destroyed bridges and fought any Yankee troops they found. Surprise. And, around Christmas 1916 there was a terrible battle on the Eastern Front north of Riga between the Germans and Russians. On Dec. 23, two Latvian brigades

Operation_Linebacke rII_ B-52_Stratofortress

Operation_Linebacke rII_ B-52_Stratofortress

surprised elements of the Kaiser’s 8th Army. During the “Christmas Battle”, about 40,000 troops supported by 200 big guns attacked the German lines. By the end of Christmas week a quarter of them were dead. No surprise. In December 1941, Britain was forced to surrender Hong Kong to Japan and in 1944 Patton rolled into Bastogne. Surprise. In 1979, the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. Nixon launched the Christmas bombing campaign on Hanoi in 1972. Beginning on December 18th and continuing for eleven days, the air assault Codenamed Operation Linebacker II painted Hanoi’s skies with B-52 Stratofortresses and 2,000 strike aircraft. More than 20,000 tons of bombs were dropped on the city making it one of the largest air campaigns in history.

Fewer tales are told of soldiers quitting the battle for a night of peace and quiet.  History.com relates one such event in 1914. “…Starting on Christmas Eve, many German and British troops sang Christmas carols to each other across the lines, and at certain points the Allied soldiers even heard brass bands joining the Germans in their joyous singing.

Christmas 1914

Christmas 1914

At the first light of dawn on Christmas Day, some German soldiers emerged from their trenches and approached the Allied lines across no-man’s-land, calling out “Merry Christmas” in their enemies’ native tongues. At first, the Allied soldiers feared it was a trick, but seeing the Germans unarmed they climbed out of their trenches and shook hands with the enemy soldiers. The men exchanged presents of cigarettes and plum puddings and sang carols and songs. There was even a documented case of soldiers from opposing sides playing a good-natured game of soccer….” These are the men and women who take care of our rude and nasty business on Christmas when diplomacy fails.

Tonight is no exception. Men and women around the globe are watching tracers, stuck in mountain hellholes, or eating dinner in a mess tent far away and down the road. We thank them and the contractors who support them. Today we are fighting a hellacious enemy dedicated to reforming the world in his own image. He is not likely to call it a night and meet in the middle for a hot toddy or friendly game of cards. Gifts and boxes

Someone's child.

Someone’s child.

have been sent and donations made, but it is not enough. The candles in our window remain lit in faith that there is a way home.

Our teenage boys want to be soldiers. They want to huddle in tanks, shiver on decks, and march through the night to save a way of life. I know what that reality looks like and I want them home fighting over whether the last throw of the football was a fair catch.

Merry Christmas from our home to yours. We wish each and every one of you a safe and joyous Christmas. However you celebrate this time in your culture, I am pulling for the human race to survive and thrive together in mutual respect. It’s time to prepare the apples for the next batch of pies.

China: A Morphogenetic Creation

[Author’s Note: A special word of thanks is due John Malch and the Webmaster at the Full-Spectrum-Dominance docking site for forcing the questions that needed asking.]

For 2,000 and more years China lived under imperial rule.  China’s silk, tea and the sciences

The Qing Dynasty ruled China from 1644 to 1911. (Source: Shutterstock / Hung Chung Chih )

The Qing Dynasty ruled China from 1644 to 1911. (Source: Shutterstock / Hung Chung Chih )

brought home to Europe by Western explorers donated fuel to restart the engine of Western civilization after the dark ages.  Thanks to China’s development of the compass, gunpowder, paper making, and printing,[1] we in the West  have been able to find ‘the war’, wage it, record it and get the word out to everyone else about how well it all went.  Like any other large central government, Chinese imperial rule bred massive corruption, a military turned inward on the people, a nanny-state to keep the citizenry predictable and rebels easily identifiable, and the required surveillance to calm the state’s paranoia.  And then, in 1912, the 2,000 years of imperial rule was over; ousted by a few insiders that liked the ring of the word ‘republic’.

Morphogenesis

The three-year old Pu-Yi, Emperor of China (standing); his father, Prince Chun, and his younger brother.

The three-year old Pu-Yi, Emperor of China (standing); his father, Prince Chun, and his younger brother.

The embryo of the Chinese republic was an interesting hybrid.  As the cells of the new body politic came alive, “the embryological processes of differentiation of cells, tissues, and organs and the development of organ systems according to the genetic “blueprint” of the potential organism and environmental conditions”[2] began to unfold; the morphogenetic creation that is China today was underway.  China’s imperial rule ended bathed in corruption rather than blood.  The Qing/Manchu Dynasty’s Aisin-Gioro PuYi, China’s last emperor, abdicated the Dragon Throne by proxy; the Empress Dowager Longyu, the mother who adopted him, signed the paperwork.

The Set-Up

China was up to its imperial neck in debt when the toddler, PuYi, assumed the Dragon Throne in 1908.  Foreign entanglements, particularly with Britain, had “humbled the Qing in

Sun Yat-sen (seated, second from left) and his revolutionary friends, the Four Bandits, including Yeung Hok-ling (left), Chan Siu-bak (seated, second from right), Yau Lit (right), and Guan Jingliang (關景良) (standing) at the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese.

Sun Yat-sen (seated, second from left) and his revolutionary friends, the Four Bandits, including Yeung Hok-ling (left), Chan Siu-bak (seated, second from right), Yau Lit (right), and Guan Jingliang (關景良) (standing) at the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese.

battle, carved out rich territories and extracted huge payments”[3]. The imperial goods were pawned for state income because income from other sources had slowed to a trickle. Provinces separated from the empire, citizens revolted and demanded a republic.  The revolutionaries were rewarded on October 10, 1911 in Nanjing when Sun Yat-sen was installed as the first president of the Republic of China. In a last ditch effort to regain central control, General Yuan Shikai became the court appointed prime minister.  General Yuan Shikai wasn’t overly attached to the idea of a republic but he did want the Qing dynasty gone by whatever means necessary.

General Yuan Shikai (1859-1916)

General Yuan Shikai (1859-1916)

Shikai made an offer the imperial family could not refuse.  When faced with beheading, Empress Dowager Longyu, Prince Yikuang, and the Empress Dowager’s head eunuch, Xiao Dezheng each took over $1.6 billion in silver to the bank.  The rest of the royal court was given the leave-or-lose-your-head option only.  PuYi left the Forbidden City, and as he grew into manhood ruled a Japanese controlled corner of North East China briefly.  Later, Chairman Mao allowed PuYi to work in the Botanical Gardens until his death in 1967, from complications of kidney cancer and heart disease.  We know this history through Jia Yinghua’s, The Extraordinary Life of the Last Emperor.[4]  An historian and former government official, Yinghua, compiled the fascinating history of China’s pivot point between imperial rule and a republic from the secret archives at Zhongnanhai, the Chinese leadership compound, and from interviews with relatives of the imperial courtiers. Continue reading