Reflections of a Cold War Warrior – Duty

Reflections of a Cold War Warrior – Duty

Duty is the fourth in a series of Reflections of a Cold War Warrior written by Steve Traywick. This series provides a rare behind-the-scenes view of what a recruit in the military experiences in the transformation from boy to warrior; from a kid next door to a man who is willing to give his life to keep you free. His first three posts, Every story has a beginning and this one is mine, Reflections of a Cold War Warrior, Reflections of a Cold War Warrior – Being There are great reads!

Author: Steve Traywick

Note:  Most of these events happened in the early 1980’s.  I was in my early twenties.  I wish

Steve Traywick in Basic Training, Fort Knox, KY, June 1979

Steve Traywick in Basic Training, Fort Knox, KY, June 1979

I could remember the minute-to-minute and day-to-day details of everything that went on then but, unfortunately, time has washed a lot of that out of my memory.  As I write this, I’m clawing away at my memory for any details I can remember.  A lot of events are hazy, but the names of the guys I served with are not.  I want to put their names here so that no one will forget that they were real people.  Guys, dudes, bros, GI’s, soldiers, tankers, scouts,…When you see a post where someone talks about signing their name to a blank check, ‘payable to the US Government and people’, ‘good for one life’. This is quite literally true.   Each person that served did, in fact, offer their life to their country.

They probably weren’t thinking that when they enlisted, but that’s what it boiled down to.  The guys I served with (I still can’t bring myself to remember most of them as MEN.  We were just kids, really.) came into the military for myriad reasons; couldn’t find a job in the late seventies economy; education benefits; a sense of adventure; an honest of sense of duty to country; a chance to see another part of the world.

Hey New Guy

“The values composing civilization and the values required to protect it are normally at war.  Civilization values sophistication but in an armed force, sophistication is a millstone.” T. R. Fehrenbach, This Kind of War

“Hey, New Guy, you know where you are, right?  You’re thirty klicks from the Grenze.  The entire Russian army is just on the other side of the border.  We’re well within artillery range

Grenze

Grenze

if the balloon goes up.  They’ve probably got about thirty arty battalions targeted on the parade ground right now.  Yep, if the balloon goes up your life expectancy is about fifteen seconds.”

Every new guy heard this recital or a version of it; GI’s love to ease their own inner fear and nervousness by passing it along to someone else.  B Troop was set perpendicular to the parade ground and Regimental Headquarters.  Of an evening while waiting for 1700 recall formation we would cluster around an open window at the end of the hall looking out over the parade ground smoking and joking.  One evening as we were grab-assing there was a loud explosion from the parade ground. It echoed down the hallway.  I swear for a second I had no neck; just my head attached to my shoulders and I was flat on the floor.   Continue reading